Cloud Computing

Cloud computing is a model for enabling ubiquitous, convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort.

Proponents claim that cloud computing allows companies to avoid upfront infrastructure costs, and focus on projects that differentiate their businesses instead of on infrastructure.

Proponents also claim that cloud computing allows enterprises to get their applications up and running faster, with improved manageability and less maintenance, and enables IT to more rapidly adjust resources to meet fluctuating and unpredictable business demand. Cloud providers typically use a “pay as you go” model. This can lead to unexpectedly high charges if administrators do not adapt to the cloud pricing model.

Cloud computing promises several attractive benefits for businesses and end users. Three of the main benefits of cloud computing include:

Self-service provisioning: End users can spin up computing resources for almost any type of workload on-demand.
Elasticity: Companies can scale up as computing needs increase and then scale down again as demands decrease.
Pay per use: Computing resources are measured at a granular level, allowing users to pay only for the resources and workloads they use.